Tag Archives: Arts

Richard Lewis and ‘The (Blank) From Hell’

Go ahead and call Richard Lewis the comedian from hell. You’d be paying him a compliment. The stand-up comedian, who died on Tuesday, was known for his dark clothes, dark sense of humor and a recurring role as a, yes, even darker version himself on HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” He was a fixture in the comedy world for over half …

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Review: In ‘Brooklyn Laundry,’ There’s No Ordering Off the Menu

Fran and Owen have been chatting for only a few minutes, not all that companionably, when he asks her out. It’s a risky thing to do, since she’s a customer at the drop-off laundry he owns. To Owen, though, Fran resembles his ex-fiancée: “Smart, one inch from terrific, but gloomy,” he says. So bone-tired of being single that a casual …

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Richard Lewis Recalled Friendship With Larry David in One of His Last Interviews

“Curb” began airing on HBO in 2000 and once took a six-year hiatus between seasons. Did Lewis imagine David would change his mind about ending it now? “He’s always changed his mind,” Lewis said. The two met as kids at summer camp and had been friends for most of their lives, including in their early days as stand-ups in New …

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Micheline Presle, Actress Known for ‘Devil in the Flesh,’ Dies at 101

Micheline Presle, a subtle and elegant actress who was a last link to the first golden age of French cinema, died on Feb. 21 in Nogent-sur-Marne, a suburb of Paris. She was 101. Her death, at the Maison des Artistes, a retirement home for artists partly funded by the government, was confirmed by her son-in-law, Olivier Bomsel. Ms. Presle (pronounced …

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Venice Biennale Says It Will Disregard Petition to Ban Israel

In a sign of the deep divisions over the war in Gaza, thousands of artists signed an open letter urging the Venice Biennale to ban “any official representation of Israel” during the art world’s most important event. This week, they got an answer: The Biennale and Italy’s culture minister said that Israel would still be taking part. The Biennale said …

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‘Code 8: Part II’ Review: Helping a Child in Danger

If you didn’t see the 2019 movie “Code 8,” but for some reason decide to take a chance on the sequel, fear not: “Code 8: Part II” begins with a vivid account of a not-too-distant-future where 4 percent of people “possess superhuman abilities” and an authoritarian police force leans hard on robots both two- and four-legged. Having more or less …

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Review: ‘Behind the South: Dances for Manuel’ by Sankofa Danzafro

The people are on the run, crouching, protecting their heads with their hands. The people are fighting back, picking up and throwing objects. Some are struck down, but figures in white walk calmly among them: ancestors, spirits. The people are not alone. This stage image is the message-delivering culmination of “Behind the South: Dances for Manuel,” which the Afro-Colombian company …

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What to See in N.Y.C. Galleries in March

This week in Newly Reviewed, Holland Cotter covers the Studio Museum in Harlem’s residency results at MoMA PS1, Sarah Grilo’s little-seen paintings at Galerie Lelong and Mary Lucier’s heartfelt video art at Cristin Tierney Gallery. ‘And Ever an Edge: Studio Museum Artists in Residence 2022—23’ Through April 8. MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Queens; (718) 784-2086, momaps1.org. In 1968, the …

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These Cities Aren’t Banning Meat. They Just Want You to Eat More Plants.

Amsterdam won’t be giving up its Gouda. Los Angeles eateries will keep serving up combinations of bacon, chicken, egg and blue cheese that are essential to its signature Cobb salads. And Scots can breathe a sigh of relief knowing that Edinburgh has no plans to outlaw haggis. Yet officials from each of these cities want people to consume less dairy …

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James Baldwin’s Best Books – The New York Times

James Baldwin would have turned 100 on Aug. 2 this year. His final works were published almost 40 years ago, just two years before his death in 1987. Yet his writing is as imperative as ever. He wrote with the kind of moral vision that was as comforting as it was chastising — almost surely the influence of the pulpit …

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